Archive | May 2014

Mary Ann Adelaide (aka Ada) Russell (1843-1894)

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This carte de visite is identified as Adelaide Russell. The photo was taken by J. S. Masseck in Milford, New Hampshire. It is from an old photo album that has a number of identified Russell family members. Adelaide shares the page with photos of James Russell and Mary A. Russell. On the back of Adelaide’s picture is a 2 cent revenue proprietary tax stamp. Unlike postage stamps, these stamps were sold to provide tax revenue during the Civil War. Many items such as matches, perfumes, patent medicines, playing cards and photographs were taxed. It helps to date the photo to about 1865. The handwritten cancellation on the stamp “565” may stand for May of 1865.

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Further research reveals that Adelaide was born Mary Ann Adelaide Russell, named after her mother, Mary Ann Sutherland Russell. Her father was James Russell. Born in Amherst, New Hampshire on August 25, 1843, it appears that Adelaide lived all of her life in Amherst. She was a tailoress who never married.  Her profession makes one wonder if she made the dress that she is wearing. Adelaide had two older brothers, both of whom served in, and survived, the Civil War. She died at the age of 51 on November 20, 1894 of “Chronic Bright’s Disease of the kidneys.”  She is buried in Meadow View Cemetery in Amherst, New Hampshire.

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Madeline Frances Keilty (aka Madeline DeSales Keltie) born 1890

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This dramatic little girl is identified as “Madaline Kealty, Jamaica Pl.” [Jamaica Plain is a Boston neighborhood.] Boston birth registers list Madeline Frances Keilty born 11 December 1890, the daughter of John Richard Keilty and his wife Mary. Her father was a salesman, born in Lawrence, Mass., her mother was from Anthony, Rhode Island. She attended public and Girls Latin Schools in Boston and graduated from Notre Dame Academy. She began her music career at Carl Faelton Pianoforte School in Boston and later graduated with honors from the New England Conservatory of Music. She debuted with the San Carlo Opera Company as a lyric soprano in Manhattan in 1920. She skyrocketed to operatic fame during the 1920’s, going by the stage name “Madeline DeSales Keltie” singing in numerous cities in the United States, Spain, Italy, France, Portugal, England and Canada working up to the lead role in Madame Butterfly in New York in October of 1933. The world famous tenor Enrico Caruso saw her perform in 1920 the year before his death.

The 1900 census confirms her date of birth as December of 1890, and the 1910 census concurs. Both the 1915 and 1920 censuses report that she was born in 1894. Her 1922 passport application as well as a 1929 passenger list give her date of birth as 11 December 1897. By the 1930 census she was born about 1900. She got younger as she got older!

Madeline appears to have disappeared from the limelight by the mid 1930’s. It appears that she never married.

Flip-Pal Mobile Scanner

My genealogy friends know how much I love my Flip-Pal mobile scanner. It is a magical piece of equipment. It’s lightweight, portable and scans in high resolution in color or black and white. Here are some of the things that I have used it for:

  • I’ve taken it to archives (most will allow its use – but always check with the staff) – that saves on copy costs.
  • I’ve used it to quickly scan family photos at relatives’ homes.
  • Most of the photos in this blog have been scanned using the Flip-Pal.
  • I scanned the 1918 photo album that my grandfather created. The pages were too big for a traditional scanner and it was too fragile to go through that kind of abuse. The whole album is now stored digitally on my computer where I can access it at my leisure and not worry about doing further damage to the original. The album is now safely stored away in an archival box to protect it from further deterioration.

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Which brings me to the stitching software program. By overlapping the scans slightly using the guidelines on the scanner, you can easily use the stitching software to put over-sized pictures back together. When I first got it I decided to put it to the test. The photo below is my Dad’s military Company from World War II. It is a large photo. It took ten scans, but what great results!

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I love this scanner so much that I decided to become part of their affiliate program. If you click the Flip-Pal link on the sidebar you will be taken to the website that gives you more information on purchasing a Flip-Pal. And if you buy one, I make a little moolah. <smile>